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Author Topic: My TL3 Build - Questions first..  (Read 534 times)

nick.w

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My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« on: 04 August, 2017, 08:52:51 AM »
Hi everyone

I have placed my order for the build manual which i am eager to get my hands on and have a read.  Before it arrives i have a few questions.

What wood is best to use?
I have see people use Plywood and MDF.  Is there anyone who can recommend whats best to build with?

Is there any benefit of using a mobility scooter on the base?

Are there any tools out there which might not be obvious to have but were a life saver when building.

Any tips?

I was told the templates are not to scale.  Are these easy to transfer to full toylander scale?

Just seen the post on 1 or 2 motors, so 2 it is!
sutty build is immense.. You should sell kits as i would my son would love to have a suspension on the front to bump up kerbs

Thanks

Ant-G

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #1 on: 06 August, 2017, 11:31:51 AM »
Hi Nick

Welcome to the forum- and enjoy your build!

To answer your questions:

Wood: most toylander s are built using moisture resistant
Mdf. By the time it is sealed and painted it will be fine for years. Ply will be more robust (as long as you use decent quality) but will require more prep before paint due to the wood grain texture. We built ours with moisture restistant ply and was fine.

The drive system you want to use is open. The most straightforward system is to fit toylanders own. That way you can buy all the parts off the shelf and you know that if you follow the manual you get a fully functioning vehicle.
Using a scooter can be cheaper (for ~£150 you can get batteries, controller, motor, axle and lots of miscellaneous bits and pieces that come in handy during the build). Obviously, going this route will require a bit more engineering from your side (attaching wheels to axle and axle to body....). The scooter also has an electronic brake which operates when the throttle pedal is released. It shouldn't be difficult to disconnect the electronic brake and use the toylander system if you want 2 pedals. Also with the scooter, if you fit toylander wheels direct to the rear axle it will have a top speed of ~6mph (toylander standard system is geared to 4mph which is the legal limit for pavement use)
If you go for the scooter then you want one with 34Ahr batteries and 10" wheels. The small wheeled ones will lack oomph. Scooter versions typically have a bit more torque than a 2 motor setup.
Ours was built using a shop rider mobility scooter but geared to 5mph. It could quite easily cope with 2 adults and a child.....
Tools: router, drill, saw, voltmeter, pop riveter.....etc. If you want to go the scooter route then welder, grinder, etc or a friendly metal work company!

For the build itself the best  way is to draw the plans onto the wood. If you want to play safe you could first mark out and cut out templates using 6mm mdf. This is easy to work with and cheaper than messing up 12 mm mr mdf. When you are happy with the shape then clamp it to the mr mdf and rout round it.

Other bits:
The new front axle that toylander supply looks very good
I would recommend building with a swing front axle (not as 'cool' as Suttys, but keeps all the wheels on the ground, reduces the stresses through the body and easier to drive across fields, woods, etc)
Build it how you want it- but remember, you are building it for your child and it will get banged, chipped, etc. If you become paranoid over the damage then it will put them off driving it which defeats the purpose of the build. Fortunately Ours ran around in primer for over a year- across fields and through woods, etc, used to carry bales of hay and bricks....so my initial plans of going for the perfect sprayed finish went out the window and we went for duleux eggshell applied with roller (which wtill had less orange peel than a factory built landrover!).there are some very shiney toylanders on here that do look very good.

Hope this helps a bit

Regards
Anthony

S1G

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #2 on: 06 August, 2017, 12:13:03 PM »
When I last spoke to toylander they said they no longer supplied the paper templates. Unless you are very good with would I would personally recommend going for a set of pre cut panels, this is what I did and have got to admit my build would not of progressed past the planning stage if I'd of had to cut them out myself. For the couple of hundred quid they cost I feel this was money very well spent.

jr2

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #3 on: 06 August, 2017, 06:25:35 PM »
Cutting out the panels yourself isn't too difficult - as long as you draw them out carefully and can use a jigsaw it's not a problem. The more accurate you are the easier the build will be.  Even making your own metal parts is fairly straightforward if you have a small MIG welder and a grinder. Obviously buying the panels and pre-made metal parts saves a lot of time.
keep us supplied with photos of your build of course!
JohnR
 

nick.w

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #4 on: 07 August, 2017, 09:33:24 AM »
Thanks for the replies chaps.

The new plans do not come with to scale drawings so i am going to review how much the cost of purchase the wood is compared to buying them already cut.

I'm leaning towards using Plywood as i can imagine MDF flaring after a few knocks.
How did you all remove the Ply grains? lots of filler and undercoat?

I did flick through the build manual and saw i need to build a jig for angle cuts.  Thats my only concern at the moment.  Any tips or hints on making this?

I have a few weeks before i start so will put some photos up on my progress, i need to clear my workshop before the start!


Thanks all for the help.  This will be my first project for my little one (hes 2 in November) and i expect a 6m build without putting too many hours in every night. 
What age were your children when you had a finished ToyLander?


Thanks again for all the help! There will definitely be more questions during my build!!!

Nick

jr2

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #5 on: 07 August, 2017, 12:34:05 PM »
I think MDF is tougher than you may think - the PVA sealer soaks in, especially on the edges which would normally be the weak area - although I've not got personal experience of how they hold up 'in action' as  I don't have young children.  I would think a sprayed high build primer/filler well sanded down would smooth the ply.
Both my builds have taken far longer than I thought - but it depends on how long you spend on details mostly - the basic build can be fairly quick. To be honest the jeep might be a bit of a handful for a two year old anyway, they're quite a large heavy vehicle for that age - another year would help! Starting with a clear workshop will definitely speed things up!
JohnR

nick.w

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #6 on: 07 August, 2017, 02:41:03 PM »
I think MDF is tougher than you may think - the PVA sealer soaks in, especially on the edges which would normally be the weak area - although I've not got personal experience of how they hold up 'in action' as  I don't have young children.  I would think a sprayed high build primer/filler well sanded down would smooth the ply.
Both my builds have taken far longer than I thought - but it depends on how long you spend on details mostly - the basic build can be fairly quick. To be honest the jeep might be a bit of a handful for a two year old anyway, they're quite a large heavy vehicle for that age - another year would help! Starting with a clear workshop will definitely speed things up!
JohnR

Thanks JohnR for the help!

Morris Mini

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #7 on: 07 August, 2017, 05:25:39 PM »
Regarding  using a scooter axle and disconnecting the brake, to do this, you will have to remove the brake unit from the motor, as the brake requires power to release it.
If you do this, on most scooters the controller will sense that there is no brake in circuit and will not allow the motor to run, as the brake is a "fail safe" item.

Ant-G

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Re: My TL3 Build - Questions first..
« Reply #8 on: 11 August, 2017, 11:07:06 AM »
We kept the brake connected up, just not attached to the motor and the electronics still worked. I'm sure someone with a better understanding of electronics would b able to establish a neater solution. We never got round to fitting 'proper' brakes, so kept with the scooter system.

Agewise, G was almost 3 when he started driving his toylander (in primer)- greasing the steering makes it a lot lighter! Before that he was driving a modified mobility scooter.
Another advantage of the mobility scooters is that you can adjust the max speed limit, although they soon figure it out!